And all the Bees in the Kingdom were invited….

I think this guest with his ostenatiously showy furry yellow legs is a Bumblebee.

I think this guest with his ostenatiously showy furry yellow legs is a Bumblebee.

It seemed that today was a grand day for bees in my backyard- they had quite the soiree, with all sorts of fancy dress. I can only guess that the theme was black and yellow, based on all of the coordinating outfits.
The yellow carpet…or…weeds were in full bloom, and the bees got busy with their work (bees only have working parties you know….). In fact they were so busy that they barely paid me any mind- leaving me to my Paparazzo ways without even one threat of a sting.
I have not yet identified each of these bees-so if you know anyone’s name, feel free to comment below. Let me know if you spot royalty…I did hear a buzz that some of them were sent by royal decree of the Queen.
Take a moment to notice the fashion of these bees. Boring straight yellow strips are OUT- funky patterns are IN. All of the cool pollinators are wearing their stripes in fun and funky ways- flaunting their unique identity.
Great Black Wasp- Nothing says class more than Basic Black.

Great Black Wasp- Nothing says class more than Basic Black.


Black and White Striped Wasp- wearing one of the more dramatic looks of this Bee Season.

Black and White Striped Wasp- wearing one of the more dramatic looks of this Bee Season.


This Carpenter Bee (?) wore modest understated fur.

This Carpenter Bee (?) wore modest understated fur.


This Carpenter Bee (?) has embraced the retro-grunge look of the 90s, looking a bit ragged with some beat up wings.

This Carpenter Bee (?) has embraced the retro-grunge look of the 90s, looking a bit ragged with some beat up wings.


A rare group shot.  I heard the fly was asked to leave for not conforming to the dress code.

A rare group shot. I heard the fly was asked to leave for not conforming to the dress code.


This unidentified guest really stands out with his rebellious non-parallel stripes.

This unidentified guest really stands out with his rebellious non-parallel stripes.


I believe this is a common YellowJacket, but his outfit is far from common with such bold contrasting stripes.

I believe this is a common YellowJacket, but his outfit is far from common with such bold contrasting stripes.


This might also be a YellowJacket with a subtly different look than his friend.

This might also be a YellowJacket with a subtly different look that his friend.


I think this guest with his ostenatiously showy furry yellow legs is a Bumblebee.

I think this guest with his ostenatiously showy furry yellow legs is a Bumblebee.


This guest almost looks like a fly in disguise, but since he met the dress code he was allowed to stay.

This guest almost looks like a fly in disguise, but since he met the dress code he was allowed to stay.


This bee chose to wear the classic parallel stripe look-simple, elegant and never out of style.

This bee chose to wear the classic parallel stripe look-simple, elegant and never out of style.


I can't ID this species, but he was a non-conformist in orange.  The other party goers left him alone though- he was larger than most of them, and seemed like he could be a bit of a bully- especially after one to many shots of nectar.

I can’t ID this species, but he was a non-conformist in orange. The other party goers left him alone though- he was larger than most of them, and seemed like he could be a bit of a bully- especially after one to many shots of nectar.


This unidentified partygoer may not be a bee at all- but he won my award for best dressed of the afternoon with his beautifully groomed antennae and his formal cape-like wings.

This unidentified partygoer may not be a bee at all- but he won my award for best dressed of the afternoon with his beautifully groomed antennae and his formal cape-like wings.


Another view of the lovely best-dressed gentleman with his cape-like wings and perfectly styled antennae.  Notice his elegant fur ascot as well.

Another view of the lovely best-dressed gentleman with his cape-like wings and perfectly styled antennae. Notice his elegant yellow fur scarf as well.

Well, the party was lovely, and as the unofficial photographer I was pleasantly surprised to see the variety of pollinators that gathered in my small backyard. I will never think of a bee as boring again- in fact, in just the small amount of research I did for this blog, I found that bees are very important to our ecosystem, and vital for the pollination of crops and wild plants. Many bees, including the famous bumblebee are in decline and in need of our protection.

I found lots of my information about bees in these places:
Beverly Beekeepers Association
BugGuide.net

And for more of my photography (that usually features babies and children, and not insects…..)
AnotherPerspectivePhotography.com

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

About Another Perspective Photography

I am a mother, a wife, a photographer, an alto, a friend... I am creative and quirky and funny. I love my husband and kids, I love my dog Pearl, I love my friends, I love pink. I am a photographer for Gananoque, Kingston and Brockville. I love Wedding Photography, Newborn and Baby Photography, Maternity Photography, and Family Photography.

One response to “And all the Bees in the Kingdom were invited….”

  1. Mike Powell says :

    Wonderful shots of an amazing variety of flying insects. I identified a hover fly (the one that you noted looks like a fly) and I think the one with orange is a kind of wasp. I loved your commentary–you could do the TV coverage of the fashions of the Academy Awards.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: